It was only two years ago that Acronym released its first Presto with Nike, even though it feels like a generation ago in terms of sneaker releases. Predating the Off-White collection, the remix that Acronym brought to the Presto was a big surprise—at that point Nike very rarely let collaborators edit its silhouettes. It was a shot across the bow for traditionalists, and caused a well-deserved fervor. This year they followed up the partnership with a trio of Prestos that played with pattern as much as texture, and color as much as expectations. We don't think the 2018 pairs quite live up to the 2016 pairs, but they're still a welcome addition to 2018's list.
Kendrick Lamar moving from Reebok to Nike was a natural because Nike gave him the Cortez, and nary has a combination of sneaker and artist felt more seamless. Kendrick used the opportunity to put out a series of colorways inspired by his music and evolving identity, offering a range of aesthetics. The Cortez Kenny III is the best one yet. Black, white, and red play off classic sneaker colorways, but Lamar injected the sneakers with details like Chinese characters embroidered into the toe and "BET IT BACK" printed on the tongue ribbon. It's a brilliant pairing.
Clearly you can find shoes at a local store, but you may find lower prices shopping online. Also, buying online is easier and cheaper than special ordering from a local store, especially if you need shoes in an atypical size or style. Shipping is one of the biggest drawbacks, but many online stores have begun offering free shipping, either on all orders or on orders that exceed a certain dollar amount.
Update your cool weather wardrobe with a pair of women's boots from Overstock.com. Take to the woods with chunky and durable styles from Timberland that keep your feet comfortable and dry on long hiking treks, or combine your jeans and casual look with a pair of Black Star cowboy boots that are the perfect choice for line dancing or attending that next big concert. Dressy styles from Naturalizer or Carlos Santana go from the board room to a night out with someone special, while colorful synthetic rain boots let you walk to and from class in snow and ice without slipping or getting your socks wet. Boots with heels let you soar to new heights, while flats keep you grounded and are ideal for long days out shopping with friends.
Designer Exclusions (Certain categories of merchandise are excluded): Akris, Ala�a, Balenciaga, Birkenstock, Brunello Cucinelli, Céline, Chanel, Chloé, Christian Dior, Christian Louboutin, Comme des Garcons, Dior Homme, Dries Van Noten, Ermenegildo Zegna, Fendi, Filson, Givenchy, Gucci, Kate Spade New York handbags, Lanvin, Loro Piana, Maison Margiela, Miu Miu, Off-White, Prada, Private Label, Sacai, Ugg, Valentino, Versace.
This year saw the wide release of Adidas’s Futurecraft 4D, a true advancement in sneaker technology. Adidas has solved the problems around 3D printing, using a fast and efficient process to mass produce soles in a sustainable way. Each sole contains up to 12,000 "struts," or printed arms, that have been carefully and individually calibrated to create the most supportive sole possible. The 4D carries with it a massive price tag, but all advances come at a cost. The shoes look amazing and are honestly worth every penny.
The sock runner trend, perfected by the Balenciaga Speed Trainer, hit its apogee with Reebok's Run.r. Like we said, Balenciaga perfected the look, but these Sock Run.rs are still amazing. The upper is about as simple a sock you can get, with some printing on the throat, but the sole is what's most interesting about the shoe. The seemingly multi-unit sole features what looks like a separated toe (it's connected to the rest of the sole under the sneaker), a taller section at the ball for stability, and a heel cup at the back. The look is intense but surprisingly well balanced.
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It would be a lie to say that there's nothing special about the Court Purple and Pine Green Air Jordan 1s. Sort of. It's actually their simplicity that makes them special. The Jordan 1 is arguably the sneaker that launched all of sneaker culture, and while classic colorways are what sneakerheads use to measure the truth of the industry, the recent new colorways from Jordan Brand have been quickly metabolized into the mainstream. Both green and purple are colors that the larger brands seldom use in popular sneaker designs, so to see both of them used as major shades on the Jordan 1 the same week was a great move for everyone.
This is the first question most people ask. Like shoes for any other sport, wrestling shoes fall on a vast price spectrum. You can get perfectly serviceable wrestling shoes for $45 or pay nearly $200 for a top-of-the-line pair. The perception is that the more expensive the shoes, the better they are. To an extent that’s true. But better for whom? That the question you should ask. The more expensive styles generally carry the latest advancements and materials, and cater to the more advanced wrestler’s abilities.
The UltraBoost has been a homerun for Adidas year after year, but sometimes we wonder if the three stripes is resting on its laurels with that one. This year, it offered a refreshing update: the UltraBoost Clima. It quickly followed up with a Parley for the Oceans collaboration. The Clima version of the UltraBoost utilizes breathability for a ton of added texture without disrupting the silhouette that's made the sneaker so popular. The blue Parley yarn is a welcome injection of color into the otherwise entirely neutral sneaker. Plus, because the yarn is made from ocean waste, each pair of these shoes represents a cleaner planet.

With the possible exception of track and field, there isn’t another sport as spartan as wrestling when it comes to individual gear. Compared to competitions that require helmets and bats and sticks and skates and shin guards, wrestling requires only headgear, a singlet, a mouthguard and shoes. The most important piece of that puzzle in terms of athletic performance, the one piece that directly affects the outcome of a match, is a pair of wrestling shoes. Here’s what most beginners and their parents ask when looking for this vital piece of equipment.
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